Nutritional advice is tricky to navigate. Food science is incomplete, evolving, sometimes contradictory, and easily misrepresented by people and companies who have something to sell. We are bombarded with passionate messages about foods that will allegedly save our lives—or ruin them. What to eat?

Most students (about 75 percent) are pretty sure they know which foods are good or bad for their health, according to a recent survey by Student Health 101.

Here’s what we found when we looked at those “pretty confident” students:

  • Only one in five said they know where to get reliable nutrition information.
  • These students were split on certain key nutritional questions.
  • They generally agreed on some of the other questions, but were their conclusions in line with the scientific evidence?

 

Video is loading...

You must enter your name, email, and phone number so we can contact you if you're the winner of this month's drawing.
Your data will never be shared or sold to outside parties. View our Privacy Policy.

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us More
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:



HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?

First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:



Article sources

Shabnam Greenfield, MS, RD, nutrition consultant, Foxhall Internists, PC, Washington DC.

Gary D. Miller, PhD, associate professor, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Karen Moses, EdD, RD, CHES, director of wellness, Arizona State University, Tempe.

National Center for Health Statistics. (2010, March 3). Adults’ daily protein intake much more than recommended. Retrieved from https://nchstats.com/category/protein/

Durusoy, R. & Karababa, A. (2011). Plastic food packaging and health. TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin, 10(1), 87–96.

Entine, J. (2014, September 17). The science on GMOs. Forbes.com
Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonentine/2014/09/17the-debate-about-gmo-safety-is-over-thanks-to-a-new-trillion-meal-study/
           
Mayo Clinic. (2016, April 16). Nutrition and healthy eating. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/sodium/art-20045479
           
Student Health 101 survey, October 2016.